FAQ's

What is the Restore the Shore project?

The Restore the Shore project is bringing back the health of the estuary in Squamish for today’s community and future generations. It will restore vitally important habitats of endangered Chinook salmon, a keystone species to local ecosystems, and critically important to the community and our way of life. It is also an act of reconciliation for the Skwxkwú7mesh Úxwumixw (Squamish Nation), the original stewards and knowledge-keepers of this land, and the wildlife that has thrived here in the past.

Which organization is leading this initiative?

The Restore the Shore project is being led by a collective, including the Skwxkwú7mesh Úxwumixw (Squamish Nation), Squamish River Watershed Society and Fisheries and Oceans Canada.

How is it being funded?

It is being generously funded by partners including the Coastal Restoration Fund, Pacific Salmon Foundation and the BC Hydro Fish & Wildlife Compensation Program (FWCP).

Why is the spit being modified?

The berm was put into the Squamish River estuary for industrial purposes, without consideration for the impact it would have on the flow of water, the habitat it provides and the ecosystem that thrives there. Consequently salmon stocks have plummeted from 100,000s to 10,000s as the estuary provides a safe haven and protective nursery for juvenile Chinook, along with the interconnected ecosystem including Southern Resident orcas, bears, eagles, dolphins and birds. It is also an act of reconciliation for the Skwxkwú7mesh Úxwumixw (Squamish Nation), the original stewards and knowledge-keepers of this land, and the wildlife that has thrived here in the past. 

Is there not an alternative?

It is the berm itself that is specifically and negatively impacting the flow of water, the habitat it provides and the ecosystem that thrives there. Without modifying the berm, it will be nearly impossible for the Squamish River estuary to return to the thriving ecosystem that it was prior to the construction of the berm.. The project team will leave the end of the berm intact for recreational users to enjoy, particularly those that use this point for launch (kiteboarders, paddleboarders, kayakers, etc).

When is the spit being modified?

The first phase of the berm modification (300m of the spit) is expected to begin in November 2021